Autumn MBSR Course

Our next online mindfulness course starts on Tuesday 19 October at 6:45pm-9:15pm.  The programme runs over 8 consecutive weeks and includes a silent retreat on Saturday 27 November from 1-6pm.  Like all worthwhile endeavours, full commitment to each session is important.

Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction

MBSR is the gold standard of mindfulness programmes because much of the supporting research around mindfulness uses MBSR.  Plus, the curriculum has remained unchanged since Jon Kabat-Zinn first developed it in the 1970s.  Basically it just works, but your motivation and intentions are key!

The MBSR curriculum challenges participants to turn towards difficulty in order to become more familiar with how we react to it.  This can be challenging for both participant and teachers. This is why MBSR teachers must complete robust training and engage with continual professional development.  Properly trained teachers are registered with the British Association of Mindfulness-Based Approaches (BAMBA) and must abide by their good practice guidelines.  Always look out for the BAMBA logo to help you feel confident about the course and teacher you choose.

Cost

The cost of the MBSR course is £300.  However, in the spirit of community and making this powerful tool more accessible, we offer some assisted places on a first come first served basis.

Don’t Rush

Before you make a decision it’s good practice for your teacher to talk through the course with you. This is why we include a free interview to describe what the course entails and answer any questions you may have.

The orientation interview usually takes 30 minutes and there’s no obligation to sign up after the interview.  It’s simply an opportunity for us both to be clear that the course is right for you.

We believe mindfulness can make everyone smile more.  If you are interested in our next online course please click here to book an orientation interview

Finding Peace in a Frantic World

When the book Mindfulness: Finding Peace in a Frantic World was published in 2011, it was a game changer. It built on the ideas and structure of earlier more clinically- oriented mindfulness-based programmes, but made the programme accessible to a much wider audience. The course offers mindfulness practices in ways that we can all use, and guides us in how to apply mindfulness in our everyday lives both to manage difficulties but also to cultivate joy, compassion, equanimity and wisdom. It offers a different way of living.

Finding Peace in a Frantic World runs over eight consecutive weeks.  It introduces mindfulness and provides teaching support for developing a personal mindfulness practice, and invaluable resources. It is being taught in community settings, higher education settings, and in workplaces all over the world. Since January 2013 it has been taught to parliamentarians and their staff in the UK Houses of Parliament.

When is the next course?

Our next Finding Peace course starts on Monday 18 October at 6pm and finishes at 8pm.  It runs over eight consecutive weeks.  The venue is Kambe House on Portland Square, in the heart of Bristol

How much does it cost?

The cost of the Finding Peace course is £200.  But, in the spirit of community and making this powerful tool more accessible, we offer some assisted places on a first come first served basis.

Don’t Rush

Deciding whether mindfulness is right for you, or if it’s a good time to do it, can be difficult. So we include a free interview to describe what the course entails and answer any questions you may have.

The orientation interview usually takes 30 minutes but there’s no obligation to sign up. It’s an opportunity for us both to be clear that the course is right for you. 

We believe mindfulness can make everyone smile more.  If you would like to learn more about our next course please click here to book an orientation interview.

What do I need to know?

The book, Mindfulness: Finding Peace in a Frantic World, accompanies the course so you will need to purchase your own copy.  It can be found in all good book stores for around £14.  More information about the course can be found here.

This book accompanies the course so you will need to purchase your own copy.

 

Can companies actually help workers stay happy and healthy?

Online mindfulness at home

Here’s a great blog by Kate Morgan that caught my eye recently.  It looks at the growing need for us all to take care of one another, and employers’ responsibility to create a supportive work environment.  Brief workshops for well-being activities, such as mindfulness,  don’t cut the mustard.  A sustained and meaningful approach is required if we are to take our mental health seriously.  Over to Kate…

More employers are providing mental-health benefits to employees. But is this what workers want – and can they actually help keep people well?

When Eliza, 31, first went to work at a large US investment firm six years ago, it was a “’we don’t talk about our feelings at work’ kind of place”, says Eliza, who is withholding her surname for job-security concerns. “It’s money, so it’s all about numbers, numbers, numbers. There was no place for a compassionate work culture. That’s what I felt like I worked in for years.” Continue reading “Can companies actually help workers stay happy and healthy?”

Awareness of Breath and Body

The awareness of breath and body practice is a staple in mindfulness meditation. Mindfulness guides us to use the experience of the breath and the body because they exist in the present moment.  This is exactly where we need to be if we want to get away from the busyness of the mind.

I know this sounds so simple, and in many ways it is, but as with all mindfulness meditations, we’re up against the autopilot mind.  And this character does not like being in the present. Far from it.  The mind is constantly referencing past experiences in order to navigate to the best outcome in the future.  In itself, this isn’t a bad feature of the human mind, it’s just that quite often the process can become relentless and exhausting.  It’s precisely at this time that we need to recognise overthinking is not our best option and do something different.

Stop overthinking and Sit

We need time to disconnect from rumination because if we haven’t solved the issue in a sensible amount of time, continuing  can do more harm than good.  Research shows we become more clear-thinking and productive by taking time out to calm the mind and body.    So a short mindfulness meditation not only saves you from unnecessary stress and worry, it also gives your cognitive resources a boost.  How many situations can you think of where this would be a sensible option to take?

The great thing with this short sitting practice is you can do it anywhere.  In a traffic jam, during your lunch break, sitting in the park, waiting to see your doctor, or even sat on the loo!

I notice lots more people sitting with their eyes closed these days, and why not?  Once you are familiar with the simple steps of the guidance you can self-guide. It doesn’t have to be perfect, you just have to follow your intention to pay attention to the direct felt experience of sitting and breathing.

Here’s a 10 minute sitting practice to get you going.  I hope you enjoy.

 

 

Loving Kindness Practice

Finding time for the loving kindness practice on a regular basis makes a whole lot of sense but it’s a practice that can feel a bit awkward to start off with.  It took me a little while to get comfortable with it but perseverance really did pay off and I heartily recommend it.

In this blog I’ve included a short version which offers a practical glimpse into the power of this practice.  In a more formal setting it would be at least twice as long as this one because the full practice explores more levels of emotional energy. The benefit of starting small is that it’s easier to get a good foothold and realise the benefits for yourself before the deep dive.

The basic principle behind loving kindness practice is to remind us of how good love and compassion makes us feel.  We readily offer them to family and friends but forget to save some for ourselves.   This behaviour carries a warning i.e. your reserves won’t last long and you will suffer.  We need to let in loving kindness not just give it out.

On the other side of the coin, this practice reminds us how holding on to negative energy can be health-sapping.  Conversely, by releasing ourselves from ill feelings and resentment is liberating and health giving.

So how do we do this?  Simple, just do the practice and find out.  I hope you enjoy this short version of the loving kindness practice.

 

The 3 Step Breathing Space Practice

Being a mindfulness teacher I often get asked “what’s a quick and easy bit of mindfulness you can share with me?”  And to be honest I don’t like the question because it assumes mindfulness is about quick fixes, which is definitely isn’t!

What I am happy to share at times like this is one of my favourite practices, the 3 step breathing space.  I call it a pocket-practice because you can carry it with you and use it absolutely anywhere.  The results can be transformative and once you’re practiced enough to run through the steps without thinking you can literally go through the steps in the time it takes to breathe in and out.

So what’s so good about the 3 step breathing space?

All mindfulness practices help us to focus attention on what’s going on in the present moment and usually this is done formally, with time taken to prepare a space where you won’t be disturbed.  The 3 step breathing space is what we call an informal practice which makes it more flexible and perfect in real time situations.

For example, imagine you’re having a difficult or challenging conversation and you’re getting triggered.  Anger and fear rise automatically and before you know it you’ve said something you regret.

This kind of reactivity is dangerous because it happens so quickly it can feel like a normal behaviour,  just part of who we are, so the next time a similar situation arises we repeat the pattern.  What we need is something to break the cycle and this is where the 3 step breathing space comes in.

The practice in action

Now imagine the same conversation except this time you notice the sensations of being triggered, maybe tightness in the tummy, a frown on the forehead, buzzing in the brain etc.  As you acknowledge these early warning signals, rather than subconsciously riding them,  you increase your mental capacity enough to remind you where you’re heading.  You’ve stepped off the stress express and with a simple out-breath you’re able to speak calmly and consciously. This is the 3 step breathing space in action but, as with all mindfulness practices, it takes practice to use it this skilfully.

Try it for yourself

This may sound too good to be true but I guarantee that with some practice you’ll soon get the gist of it.  Do the practice a few times a day and when you feel familiar enough with the 3 steps you can experiment and make it your own.  Good luck.

 

 

Why bother getting a mindfulness meditation teacher? by Hector Taylor

This is a question you may have pondered yourself and it’s completely justified.  I totally get that taking the leap into meditation and finding the right teacher can be a bit daunting.  So imagine my delight when Hector, a guy I worked with recently,  told me he had written a blog about the mindfulness journey we shared – no need for me to tip-toe around the many reasons I could give for living life more mindfully.  He tells the story much better than I ever could.  Over to you Hector.

“Daddy, since you started meditating you are a lot calmer and you seem a lot happier”.

This is what my twelve-year-old daughter said to me one bleak winter’s day, in the bleakest winter in memory, mid-January 2021, right smack in the middle of the covid lockdown. Her saying this made me really happy, as I had started meditating in the summer of 2020 specifically so I could cope with the inevitable winter lockdown.

I am divorced, and although my kids live with me half the time, I felt very lonely and restless when I was alone in the house.  I was particularly anxious about the idea of long winter days working at home not having any contact with other humans.

Initially I had found a meditation course on the Headspace app that addressed loneliness. I used that for a month or so, and it seemed to improve things. At least while I was actually meditating, I didn’t feel so restless. I thought it worthwhile to keep going and see if it could improve other areas of my life; maybe make me slightly more at ease with day-to-day living; and therefore help my kids be more at ease with their lives too.  

I did other courses on the Headspace app, but as they got more advanced, they asked me to use visualisation or just to follow the breath. I found these practices really challenging, as my mind raced all over the place. While this is “normal and natural”, it didn’t feel like I was doing very well, and I was becoming a bit disheartened. 

Maybe you are at a similar point. I can picture you sitting in your meditation position, with a slightly dissatisfied look on your face. You have just finished meditating, but you really aren’t convinced you’ve done it right. Despite practising regularly for the last few months, you don’t really believe that you’re getting any better at meditation.

So what do you do?  Do you give up meditation altogether?  But you do believe it is benefiting you in some way.

Maybe try another meditation app that is better than the one you’re on? But you’ve been using Headspace and everybody else seems to rate it.

Maybe just need to try harder while you’re meditating?  But everything you’ve heard tells you that trying harder is counter-productive for meditation.

Perhaps there’s another way to get better meditation? Maybe there are people out there who can teach mindfulness meditation? Maybe you could find a meditation teacher that won’t lure you into some weird religious cult?

Do these teachers actually exist? How do you find them? How much do they cost?

In this blog, hopefully I will answer these questions and I’ll tell you how I got on.

How weird are Mindfulness Meditation teachers?
I spoke to three or four teachers before I decided on Simon Barnes, a Mindfulness Meditation teacher in Bristol. To be fair, they all seemed to be decent reasonable people. In my admittedly limited experience, people involved in mindfulness tend to be very genuine and really believe in what they are teaching. But they are rarely preachy, and don’t try to sell you an impossible dream. Mindfulness is a westernised secular form of Buddhism, so no teacher is likely to get overly spiritual or religious.

I chose Simon because the course timing suited me, and he seemed like a normal bloke. He would describe himself as a Buddhist but he rarely uses Buddhist terminology. Also he drinks beer and watches rugby. These are two of my favourite habits, that I had no desire to stop simply because I wanted to get better at meditating.

What qualifications do mindfulness teachers have?
One of the frightening things about mindfulness is that it is completely unregulated. Anyone could set themselves up as a mindfulness teacher, so it is open to abuse. That said, there’s a lot of science behind mindfulness meditation.

Buddhist meditation practices were first westernised by John Kabat-Zinn who is a professor of medicine at MIT and has a PhD in molecular biology. Many of the mindfulness leading lights are academics in recognised universities; for example Kristin Neff, a specialist in self-compassion mindfulness, is a professor in educational psychology at Texas University. One of the leading voices in the UK is Mark Williams, a professor of clinical psychology at Oxford University. In fact Oxford along with Bangor and Exeter universities are the leading education centres for mindfulness in the UK.

They set up the British Association of Mindfulness-Based Approaches (BAMBA). So if your teacher belongs to BAMBA they are likely to have had thorough training. Simon Barnes did a Masters in Mindfulness over five years at Bangor University. 

How will a mindfulness teacher teach you?
If the teacher has come through the BAMBA training they’re likely to teach you one of these courses:

How much does a mindfulness teacher cost?
Obviously this will vary between teachers. I paid Simon £50 per session, which may sound a lot, but most sessions lasted over an hour and half. The courses tend to cost between £300 and £500 depending on the length and many are done in groups.

It won’t get too weird
If the cost isn’t prohibitive, I would recommend contacting a few teachers and speaking to them to see what they offer. You can simply Google “Mindfulness Meditation near me” or you could go through the BAMBA website. The choice is huge these days as they all teach over Zoom, so you are not limited by geography. If you go through the BAMBA website, or simply contact Simon, things won’t get too weird.

On a course the teacher will take you through various aspects of mindfulness so you can get deeper into the practice. They will also explain the science behind it and demonstrate lots of different meditations as you go along. I loved being able to discuss which meditations worked for me and which didn’t. Simon gave me realistic expectations that some just wouldn’t suit me and I should concentrate on the ones that did. Also, that even for him, some days the meditation just feels really average, and that accepting that reality is a breakthrough in itself. Having weekly sessions with him meant I kept practicing. Therefore I developed the habit of regular meditation that I have been able to sustain. Having someone to discuss the meditation with, enabled me to realise that I was making progress and getting minor breakthroughs as I went along.

These breakthroughs are notoriously difficult to describe but they do feel good, and have had a positive effect on the rest of my life. I do believe I am slightly more at ease with day-to-day living, and my family did survive the lockdown with our sanity intact. As I said my daughter certainly noticed the difference.

So be brave and give a mindfulness meditation teacher a call. You won’t get forced into anything, or any cult! You never know, if you do a course, your loved ones may tell you how much calmer and happier you are since you started meditating. 

Written by Hector Taylor
Hector is a freelance copywriter and content marketer.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/hectorottomartrain/

How Companies Can Instil Mindfulness In The Workplace

Mindfulness and meditation have made deep inroads into the corporate world. The benefits of mindfulness in the workplace are proving out, notes this opinion piece by Christian Greiser and Jan-Philipp Martini of the Boston Consulting Group. Greiser is a senior partner, managing director and the global leader of the firm’s operations practice who works with senior leaders around the globe. Martini is an associate who supports clients around the world on enterprise-wide agile transformations.

Volatile markets, challenging consumer demands, and the technological disruptions resulting from digitization and Industry 4.0 are producing unprecedented rates of change. In response, companies have worked to increase organizational agility, hoping to foster innovation and shorten go-to-market cycles. Yet organizational experiences and sociological conditioning often impede true agility. As a result, many of these efforts fall short of their objective to manage the uncertainty generated by change. But another movement — mindfulness — will help companies overcome these challenges.

Mindfulness is a centuries-old idea that has been reinvented to address the challenges of our digital age. In essence, mindfulness describes a state of being present in the moment and leaving behind one’s tendency to judge. It allows one to pause amid the constant inflow of stimuli and consciously decide how to act, rather than react reflexively with ingrained behavior patterns. Mindfulness, therefore, is perfectly suited to counterbalance the digital-age challenges of information overload and constant distraction.

The benefits of mindfulness are both clear and proven. Mindfulness in the workplace helps leaders and employees reflect effectively, focus sharply on the task at hand, master peak levels of stress, and recharge quickly. On an organizational level, mindfulness reduces sick days, increases trust in leadership, and boosts employee engagement. What’s more, mindfulness helps to unlock the full potential of digital and agile transformations. New processes and structures are just the starting points for these transformations.

Not surprisingly, interest in mindfulness in the workplace is growing, especially among digital natives: In the past decade, the rate of increase in Google searches for mindfulness has outpaced that of all Google searches by a factor of four. Furthermore, years of scientific research and modern forms of teaching have fueled its popularity. Now, mindfulness apps even come pre-installed on smartphones and tablets

Yet integrating mindfulness in the corporate context can be challenging. Some companies encounter vocal skeptics; others struggle with entrenched ways of working. Even leaders and employees who are eager to try out mindfulness find it hard to get started. To unleash the power of mindfulness in the workplace, companies will have to embrace a holistic approach to corporate agility.

Agility Requires Coping with Uncertainty

To support their agility efforts, many companies have applied “cosmetic” digital-age solutions, such as hackathons, agile meetings (for example, short daily standup meetings to discuss progress and obstacles), and new visualization techniques and creativity tools.

However, most companies have not yet created an environment that truly prepares them to reap the rewards of agility. Often, their ways of working have been shaped by a tradition of emphasizing functional excellence over agility, as well as systems that favor expertise over open-mindedness. Two inhibitors stand out:

  • Resistance to Change. As the pace of change increases, employees will have to continuously adapt to evolving circumstances. In most organizations, however, the existing ways of working leave employees unprepared to do so. They may therefore respond with reflexive resistance, a defense mechanism to avoid the discomfort of psychological uncertainty. Organizational politics and poor communication about the purpose of making changes only strengthen this resistance.
  • Overvaluing Expertise. Many employees think and interact at work by applying expertise that they gained before the digital age, when efficiency, not agility, was the overarching objective. Such an approach encourages closed-mindedness.

Mindfulness Facilitates Navigation Through Uncertainty

Mindfulness enables people to radically strengthen their ability to adapt quickly to evolving circumstances and ambiguous situations and to increase the speed with which they learn new things. It creates mental agility and helps people look inward to find answers.

In their recent book, Altered Traits, Daniel Goleman, a Harvard psychologist, and Richard J. Davidson, a neuroscientist at the University of Wisconsin, provide a scientific view of personal mindfulness benefits. They synthesize three proven benefits of mindfulness that, in combination, allow people to act more effectively in unpredictable environments:

  • Staying Calm and Open-Minded. Mindfulness practices, such as breathing meditation, are associated with decreased volumes of gray matter in the amygdala, the region of the brain that initiates a response to stress. This reduces the inclination to interpret an uncertain environment as a threat and thus react defensively. In this way, mindfulness improves mental agility, allowing attitudes to shift from “but we have always done it like that” to “let’s see what happens if we try a new approach.”
  • Cognitive Ability. Mindfulness improves short-term memory and the ability to perform complex cognitive tasks. It also frees people to think outside the box, which helps them cut through complexity. In the context of workplace performance, proven results include a higher quality of strategic decision making and more effective collaboration.
  • Focus and Clarity of Thinking. As Nobel laureate Herbert A. Simon observed, “a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.” This insight, first articulated in 1971, is more accurate today than ever before. Maintaining a strong focus in this time of digital information overload, therefore, is essential. The regular practice of mindfulness routines can reduce mental wandering and distractibility. Mindfulness strengthens the awareness of both one’s activities in the present moment and one’s mental processes and behaviors (known as meta-awareness).

By delivering these individual benefits, mindfulness boosts the potential of corporate agility initiatives and agile transformations. It helps people to inspect and adapt their behaviors in short cycles, relax so that they can rewire established attitudes, and think clearly in the midst of overwhelming digital stimuli. In short, mindfulness facilitates navigation in the context of uncertainty and ambiguity.

The Corporate World Has Taken Notice

A leading pioneer of corporate mindfulness is Jon Kabat-Zinn, who facilitated its democratization by designing a program called Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction. The course provides a simple and structured introduction to scientifically proven meditation practices. Similarly, Chade-Meng Tan has developed Search Inside Yourself, a course that combines meditation practices with emotional intelligence training — an approach he pioneered at Google.

More recently, companies in the West have turned to mindfulness in the workplace to promote employee well-being and productivity. The movement began among startups in Silicon Valley and has been implemented by long-established companies across the U.S. and Europe as well as by government bodies. These include Aetna, Beiersdorf, Bosch, General Mills, Goldman Sachs, Intel, Royal Dutch Shell, SAP, Target, the UK’s Parliament, and the U.S. House of Representatives.

Many of these organizations embrace agility and aspire to cultivate a new form of leadership. Among the top executives who meditate and encourage their employees to follow their example, for instance, are Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, and Google cofounder Sergey Brin. In fact, attending a meditation class is a popular way to begin the workday at many Silicon Valley companies, including Apple, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Over the course of many years, Bosch, a multinational engineering company that focuses on automotive components and consumer goods, has increased its agility through a variety of initiatives. These include creating flexible organizational structures, introducing agile development methods, and experimenting with new business models and technologies. In order to promote the success of these initiatives, the company realized that it needed to fundamentally change its approach to leadership. According to Petra Martin, who is responsible for leadership development at Bosch Automotive Electronics, “Mindfulness is an essential lever to shift from a culture of control to a culture of trust. Communication has fundamentally changed since we introduced our mindfulness training to more than 1,000 leaders in the organization.”

At software company SAP, mindfulness has become a key ingredient of corporate life for employees and executives alike. More than 6,000 employees have taken two-day mindfulness courses that focus on meditations complemented by the practice of self-mastery and compassion. In addition, internal mindfulness trainers offer guided meditations during working hours and a multi-week mindfulness challenge, including meditation “micropractices,” such as tuning out of a busy workday for a few minutes to focus on one’s breathing.

“For many managers, it has become the new normal to open meetings with short meditations,” says Peter Bostelmann, the director of SAP’s global mindfulness practice. Participants in the mindfulness program report increased well-being and higher creativity. What’s more, mindfulness has promoted significant measurable improvements in employee engagement and leadership trust indices. Bostelmann has seen a significant shift in how corporate mindfulness programs are perceived. A few years ago, some leaders ridiculed the concept of mindfulness at work. Recently, however, executives of other companies — including Deutsche Telekom and Siemens — have sought Bostelmann’s advice about how to adopt mindfulness concepts at their companies.

Aetna, a U.S. health insurer, has trained 13,000 employees on mindfulness practices, resulting in a reported reduction in stress levels of 28%. Annual productivity improvements, a secondary effect, are estimated at $3,000 per employee. Aetna launched the mindfulness initiatives gradually, starting with brief meditations in executive-team meetings and then continuing with yoga and meditation classes for all employees. “We have demonstrated that mindfulness-based programs can reduce stress and improve people’s health,” says Mark Bertolini, Aetna’s chairman and CEO.

How Companies Can Instill Mindfulness

To fully capture the benefits of mindfulness, companies should customize their mindfulness programs. While it is valuable to begin by determining the objective of mindfulness interventions, many organizations have also achieved good results by starting with a small pilot program, such as providing a mindfulness course to senior leadership.

For some companies, mindfulness will become a paradigm for organization design and employee well-being. In terms of adopting mindfulness generally, organizations can start by experimenting with four types of interventions: leadership training, meditation training, mindfulness micropractices and mindfulness coaching.

Leadership Training. As management guru Peter F. Drucker observed, leaders need trained perception fully as much as analysis. Well-designed leadership courses address this need by combining actionable mindfulness and emotional intelligence practices.

Even customized mindfulness leadership courses share common elements. Leaders should learn how to integrate formal and informal mindfulness practices into everyday life. Formal practices are often guided meditations, while informal practices include mindful listening exercises and simply paying attention to the task at hand.

By instilling self-awareness, self-regulation and compassion, mindfulness courses address the psychological root causes of multiple leadership problems. And because these courses also encourage the natural development of skills for managing time, change and conflict, training programs dedicated to establishing these skills might become obsolete.

At Bosch, a one-year agile leadership-training curriculum involves three modules: leading oneself, leading teams and leading the organization. The self-leadership training focuses on mindfulness and involves regular guided meditations, conscious-communication exercises and courses to help leaders avoid the pitfalls of multitasking.

At a multinational engineering company, some leaders openly expressed skepticism about the value of mindfulness in the workplace. The company converted these skeptics into believers by explaining the concept in layman’s terms, sharing scientific research about its effectiveness and inspiring senior leaders to become change agents. Today, mindfulness is the new normal for the company, and leaders pause for meditation in the designated silent room before making major decisions or having difficult discussions.

Meditation Training. In addition to training executives, organizations should evaluate whether to offer training opportunities to all employees. Many individuals are willing to try out meditation but struggle to understand where to start. A half-day to full-day course can introduce basic practices, such as breathing or body scan meditations, so that employees can subsequently continue on their own.

To reinforce their training courses, some organizations — including Google, LinkedIn and Twitter — offer guided meditations during working hours. Google has also established silent lunches and silent rooms, where employees can go to readjust their mindsets in the midst of an intense working day.

Mindfulness Micropractices. Repetitive practice of basic skills is essential to promote mastery: think of pianists playing scales throughout their careers or baseball players taking batting practice before every game. Similarly, employees who complete a meditation program need to continue practicing, through micropractices, to truly master mindfulness. Seasoned meditators report transformative mindfulness benefits once they have mastered the seamless integration of mindfulness practices into everyday life.

Organizations should invest in creating a culture in which meditation micropractices are not just tolerated but are actively disseminated by mindfulness change agents. Small workshops can also help to integrate mindfulness in a nonintrusive way. These workshops can teach approaches such as Elisha Goldstein’s STOP practice, in which participants learn to stop, take a breath, observe (thoughts, feelings, and emotions), and proceed. Beyond promoting mastery for mindfulness practitioners, micropractices can serve as an easy starting point for skeptics, who often experience surprising benefits after a few sessions.

Mindfulness Coaching. The principles of mindfulness can also help teams collaborate more effectively. For example, if team members master the ability to listen to one another with undivided attention and without interruption, they promote freer and more creative thinking. And a team culture that values appreciation over criticism helps to build transparency and openness. In her 2015 book, More Time to Think: The Power of Independent Thinking, Nancy Kline proposes that people offer appreciative comments five times as often as they do critical remarks.

Facilitation by a coach is essential to capture the benefits of mindfulness in teamwork. Agile teams typically already have scrum masters or agile coaches, and these individuals can become mindfulness coaches as well. Similarly, executive teams could benefit from mindfulness coaches to enable authentic communication and effective teamwork.

Unleashing the Power

Companies that undergo a transformation through mindfulness in the workplace are seeing positive returns both on an individual level and on an organizational level. As leaders and employees develop the open-mindedness and clarity required to navigate through unpredictable environments, the organization becomes well positioned to unlock the full potential of agility. For companies that have not yet successfully embraced mindfulness, the imperative is clear: Follow a well-designed, holistic approach to implement this centuries-old solution to digital-age challenges.

You can reach Christian Greiser at greiser.christian@bcg.com and Jan-Philipp Martini martini.janphilipp@bcg.com

Being Mindful trained with the Oxford Mindfulness Centre’s pioneering Teaching in the Workplace course. For more information about how we can instil mindfulness in your organisation click here.

Treat every moment as your last

A friend of mine recently mentioned he’d re-watched the movie Groundhog Day, and it felt incredibly familiar to life now, at least for him. But I totally got what he meant, each day is so similar to the next at the moment!

This is what he said, how does it land with you?

Not much happens differently in the external dimension. 

But there is also the internal dimension. In Zen, they talk about a beginner’s mind, seeing the ordinary in a new way. Even if what we see is the same, the way we see can change. 

The Zen teacher Suzuki Roshi liked to say,“Treat every moment as your last. It is not preparation for something else.”

It made me think, “If we live this time as if it was our last, not as preparation for something else, what might we learn?” 

In the movie Groundhog Day, the main character eventually learns from the monotony to be increasingly open-hearted and selfless. He takes a new approach to his ordinary days. 

Maybe this is what we can do in this time. We can bring a beginner’s mind to each day, and see beyond our limited self orientation.

Brother David Steindl-Rast may have done this the best in the exquisite video called A Good Day. If you have not seen it, it is worth a watch. He suggests gratefulness is the key to fully living each day. 

As we continue to quarantine and be as safe as possible, may we each find a way to engage, freshly. 

As Thich Nhat Hanh liked to remind us, The miracle is not to walk on water. The miracle is to walk on the green earth, dwelling deeply in the present moment and feeling truly alive.”

May this day in your life, today, not just be another day.

May your day be well lived. 

I love Soren’s thinking here, and Brother David’s video. They both remind us that life offers our attention a truly amazing experience every single minute. We just have to remember to calm the busy mind, pause, and reconnect with it – our life unfolding in this moment.

Soren and the Wisdom 2.0 team have some wonderful meetup’s planned which you might be interested in. Click here.

If you’d like to bring more mindfulness into your life you might like to join our next MBSR course. Arrange a free discovery session to find out what the course involves. If it appeals, we’ll book you on. If not, no worries. Click here for more info.

The Power of Mindfulness

Whenever I introduce myself to a new mindfulness course I include a little background about the journey that led me to become a teacher. There’s one point in time that stands out as a catalyst – 5th May 1984.

This is the day I sustained a spinal cord injury and was paralysed from the waist down. It was an unlucky fall and in the blink of an eye I was in hospital in a haze of sedation with a doctor telling me “I’m sorry Mr Barnes but you’ve broken your back and you’re never going to walk again!”

This is a traumatic, life changing event and naturally I was devastated, but I soon noticed people with injuries more serious than mine. A guy in the bed next to me, Laurence, broke his neck in a motorcycle accident and couldn’t move a muscle. Rather than thinking about what I didn’t have, I started to appreciate what I did have!

During rehabilitation my aim was to do the best I could, and even though difficulties were rife, I didn’t get caught up on them. I looked for a way around obstacles and kept moving. Essentially, this is how I managed the transition. Without realising it I was being mindful. I acknowledged problems when they arose, but didn’t get caught up in them. I embraced what I did have and lived life.

This is the power of mindfulness, and it’s something we all do at times. We just don’t necessarily realise it. This is why it’s important to develop a regular practice and incorporate it into our daily lives. To be mindful intentionally.

Like all worthwhile activities, if we want the rewards we have to put in the effort. No one becomes a guitarist, for example, without a lot of practice, and it’s the same with mindfulness. Dedicating just 30 minutes of your day to mindful meditation will help you to slow down the mind and be in control of the choices you make, rather than unconsciously reacting on autopilot.

Believe me, it’s really helpful to be consciously aware of all the options available to you in challenging and stressful situations. Which is not about making stress go away, it’s more a question of choosing not to freak out about thoughts of the past or the future. Instead, we consider what’s real, what’s happening in the present moment, and to the best of our ability, choose the best way forward. Isn’t this the only way?

Here’s a great Ted Talk which explains this wonderfully. It’s entitled The Power of Mindfulness: What You Practice Grows Stronger with Shauna Shapiro.