The Power of Mindfulness

Whenever I introduce myself to a new mindfulness course I include a little background about the journey that led me to become a teacher. There’s one point in time that stands out as a catalyst – 5th May 1984.

This is the day I sustained a spinal cord injury and was paralysed from the waist down. It was an unlucky fall and in the blink of an eye I was in hospital in a haze of sedation with a doctor telling me “I’m sorry Mr Barnes but you’ve broken your back and you’re never going to walk again!”

This is a traumatic, life changing event and naturally I was devastated, but I soon noticed people with injuries more serious than mine. A guy in the bed next to me, Laurence, broke his neck in a motorcycle accident and couldn’t move a muscle. Rather than thinking about what I didn’t have, I started to appreciate what I did have!

During rehabilitation my aim was to do the best I could, and even though difficulties were rife, I didn’t get caught up on them. I looked for a way around obstacles and kept moving. Essentially, this is how I managed the transition. Without realising it I was being mindful. I acknowledged problems when they arose, but didn’t get caught up in them. I embraced what I did have and lived life.

This is the power of mindfulness, and it’s something we all do at times. We just don’t necessarily realise it. This is why it’s important to develop a regular practice and incorporate it into our daily lives. To be mindful intentionally.

Like all worthwhile activities, if we want the rewards we have to put in the effort. No one becomes a guitarist, for example, without a lot of practice, and it’s the same with mindfulness. Dedicating just 30 minutes of your day to mindful meditation will help you to slow down the mind and be in control of the choices you make, rather than unconsciously reacting on autopilot.

Believe me, it’s really helpful to be consciously aware of all the options available to you in challenging and stressful situations. Which is not about making stress go away, it’s more a question of choosing not to freak out about thoughts of the past or the future. Instead, we consider what’s real, what’s happening in the present moment, and to the best of our ability, choose the best way forward. Isn’t this the only way?

Here’s a great Ted Talk which explains this wonderfully. It’s entitled The Power of Mindfulness: What You Practice Grows Stronger with Shauna Shapiro.

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